Caring for a loved can be a difficult task. With the passing of years, people get old, and more family members provide for their health and daily needs. 80 percent of care in the United States is provided by family members – who, in addition to caring for their elderly, have jobs, children, and a ton of other responsibilities. So it’s no wonder that after a certain period of providing the care, they start to feel caregivers stress.

Not all stress is bad for you. For example, animals have a stress response when they are in danger. This stress makes animals breathe faster and, with shorter breaths, their heartbeat accelerates, causing their muscles to receive a greater burst of power. In their natural habitats, this process lasts shortly over frequent periods of time. They are calm and collected after the danger passes. But for people, this is different. Caregivers stress is something that is present over long periods of time. For some, this is an every day occurrence. This affects their immune system, digestive tract, and even a caregiver’s reproductive system.

The chronic stress in caregivers causes headaches, insomnia, depression, mood swings, and irritability. In some cases, the immune system of a caregiver gets so weak that it can’t fight off simple flu or cold. Also, the caregivers who are under this condition for sustained periods of time are subject to high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, depression, anxiety, and other chronic illnesses.

Caregivers Stress

Source: www.invernessathome.org

But, there are ways that you can reduce the stress, or even completely get rid of it. In order to save and improve your health, you can do one of the following things.

  1. Exercise – Try to have at least 30 minutes of workout a day. A simple thing like walking will do.
  2. Meditate – Find a minute a day for meditation.
  3. Find the exact reason for your stress – And try to exclude it.
  4. Talk to yourself – Find positiveness in the negativity.
  5. Laugh – Laugh a lot.
  6. Find a hobby.
  7. Join a support group.

Featured Image Source: www.aarp.org